Culture

Radio

Log on and tune in— Global

Preface

The internet is transforming the way we consume music and news as more stations switch to a web-only format and internet radios roll off the production lines. Forget traditional stations – this is the future of the sung and spoken word.

Arcam, Cambridge, EVR, Internet radio, New York, listening habits

Listening habits

Internet radio (as with all radio) use seems to be a very difficult type of animal to measure. How much you listen to, how, and how much you take in, have never been so hard to quantify.

RAJAR (Radio Joint Audience Research Limited) is the UK’s audio data analyst. According to its extensive surveys that involve thousands of selected people keeping radio diaries (the biggest such survey in the world), listening of the radio via the internet represents 3 per cent of all radio.

However, another RAJAR survey of internet delivered audio services found that 16.3 million people used the internet to listen to radio in 2010. This also does not include all the streaming radio sites and podcasts.

Around eight million adults (16 per cent of the 15 plus population) claim they download podcasts. One thing is certain: internet radio is big and growing – for example, the US has over 2,000 web-only radio stations.

The station

East Village Radio New York City

With a glass-fronted studio on New York’s First Avenue, East Village Radio (EVR) is both a tangible visitor destination and one of the earliest stations to commit to an online-only presence. Monocle talked to founder Frank Prisinzano and co-owner Peter Ferraro.

How did East Village Radio start?
Frank Prisinzano: I was expanding one of my restaurants and decided to add a radio studio into the space. I wanted to put it on the street, run it on the internet only and let people catch up to that.

Does running an online station differ much from more traditional models?
Peter Ferraro: We look to champion the idea of radio presenters. Online radio demands personality and a one-to-one relationship with the listener.
FP: Nothing speaks to our DNA as much as the street studio. It’s integral to the neigbourhood and proves that live radio isn’t under threat from algorithm-based online music services.
PF: The studio also means that we can work in the old fashioned way when it comes to finding musicians. They come to us with new records, and we host lots of live performances. Being independent and online also means that we have no corporation telling us what people want to hear. We have our own platform.

How is EVR developing?
PF: I came on board almost three years ago. The station then existed very much in a community based way with little international exposure. I’ve worked really hard to brand it. We’ve invested money in technology to make sure there is a continuous stream. It’s important that there’s a sense of urgency to what we offer. We’ve updated the physical station, the brand, and the programming.

Is your global, online audience important?
PF: We’re starting to consider our scheduling to take other time zones into account as we have listeners all over the world. For a long time we didn’t programme for overnight, but DJs are beginning to understand why we move their shows. We’re affirming our editorial voice more and more. We’ve brought in a content director to help shape the site. Our mission statement is to take the culture, history and vitality of the East Village, and amplify it to the rest of the world.

How is the business run?
PF: Although the model has changed, and costs are a lot greater than they were at the beginning, Frank still funds it. Currently, DJs don’t do the show for money. We have a very high level of clicks-per-minute on the site. There is a small level of advertising, but the opportunity for us to be sponsor-based is starting to present itself. We know that being based online we have the potential for growth. We’re in talks with global companies.

eastvillageradio.com

The stats: EVR

When launched: Autumn of 2003.

Number of staff: Five members of the management team and over 70 DJs.

Key shows: Authentic Sh*t hosted by Mark Ronson, Andy Rourke’s JetLag, Frozen Files Presents hosted by Schott Free & Matt Life, Mike Joyce’s Coalition Chart Show.

Listeners: Numbers vary. Can have upwards of 300,000 live listeners per week across platforms (direct from EVR site and mobile applications for iPhone/Android).

The station

Triple J, Sydney

Sydney-based Triple J, broadcasting nationally since 1990 and focused on the 18-30 age group, was an early adopter when it came to online presence.

“We built our first website in 1995 and began streaming our signal a couple of years after that,” says station manager Chris Scaddan. “Now we absolutely consider ourselves a cross-platform entity rather than a radio station with a website.”

Online voting drives the station’s biggest annual campaign, The Hottest 100, which compiles the favourite songs of the year as chosen by listeners, and counts them down on-air. Tellingly, seven places in the most recent chart were taken up by artists discovered through triplejunearthed.com, the website that gives exposure to 26,000 unsigned, self-funded musical acts.

Scaddan says that Triple J’s main website (abc.net.au/triplej/) – which not only offers live streams, but podcasts, blogs, photo galleries, live recordings and forums – is a vital link with the world.

Meanwhile, the station’s Facebook page, which has over 310,000 friends, is becoming an increasingly significant cross-platform presence. “We’re really active on both Facebook and Twitter, which offer content, but also generate discussions and interaction with our audience,” he says. “If your audience spends most of its day online or on Facebook, you’ve got to cater for them there.”

Top 10 internet radios

1. Q2, Cube, + 44 1279 50111, q2radio.co.uk

2. Roberts, Revival iStream, + 44 1709 571 722 robertsradio.co.uk

3. Pure, Oasis Flow in silver, + 44 845 148 9001, pure.com

4. Pure, Sensia in black, + 44 845 148 9001, pure.com

5. Tivoli, Model 10+ in walnut, + 1 866 848 6544, tivoliaudio.com

6. Revo, AXiS, + 44 1555 666 161, revo.co.uk

7. Revo, Pico, + 44 1555 666 161, revo.co.uk

8. Revo, Heritage Renaissance in black oak, + 44 1555 666 161, revo.co.uk

9. Pure, Evoke Flow, + 44 845 148 9001, pure.com

10. Roberts, WM-201, + 44 1709 571722, robertsradio.co.uk

Monocle 24

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