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Founded in 2008, Borajet launched to fill the gap for domestic flights to smaller airports in Turkey, many of which are unused by traditional carriers due to their fleets being too large to land on regional landing strips. Borajet, and its fleet of smaller, turboprop planes, is the brainchild of Turkish born businessman Yalçin Ayasli, an entrepreneur who made his fortune through founding the Hittite Microwave Corporation in 1985. Despite keeping a modest profile, Ayasli, has been working to promote Turkey internationally for many years as founder of the Turkish Cultural Foundation. The airline now serves eight destinations within Turkey from its base at the Ataturk International Airport. “We’re the only turbo prop airline in the whole of Turkey so we’re in a position to offer a service to places that have just never had any kind of regular air link to Istanbul before,” says cabin crew director Seda Okumus. As well as introducing new routes, the airline is improving the standard of flying in Turkey. In order to attract VIP travellers, Borajet also offers charter services and in December 2010 began using a Global Express XRS jet (pictured). The carrier’s four ATR 72-500 turboprop jets were previously owned by AlIitalia and were given an interior revamp in Cologne before having the seat capacity in each reduced from 74 to 66 to provide extra leg room for passengers.
borajet.com.tr

Borajet facts:

Fleet: Four ATR 72-500 jets and one Bombardier Global Express XRS jet. Staff: 250 full time. Uniform: Blue skirt or trousers, white shirts, blue waistcoat and jacket with blue or red scarves. Catering: All food and drink served on board flights is complimentary. Entertainment: The airline has its own monthly glossy magazine. Eponymously titled,features are printed in both Turkish and English. Cabin design: Borajet planes have two seats on either side of the aisle, with generous butterscotch-coloured leather reclining seats.

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