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Cortiço & Netos, Graça

Joaquim José Cortiço spent some 30 years salvaging discontinued azulejos from manufacturers, amassing an enviable hoard. In 1979 he established a hardware shop and soon made a name for himself as the go-to man for tile repairs, often receiving letters from people looking for rare replacement pieces. Today, Joaquim’s netos (grandsons) – João, Pedro, Tiago and Ricardo Cortiço – have injected new life into the business with this smart retail space. Displayed on simple pine shelves in a pixelated patchwork, the ever-expanding collection now includes more than 300 different patterns and millions of square metres of tiles. Designs range from blocky mid-century geometrics to kitsch floral motifs and are sold both individually and in batches.

37D Rua Maria Andrade 1170-215
+351 919 703 705
corticoenetos.com
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Livraria Ferin, Chiado

Founded in 1840, Livraria Ferin has a distinguished history: it was the bookbinder to the kings of Portugal and in the high-ceilinged downstairs rooms – where regular author readings are held – the original tools can still be found. The shop offers contemporary novels and biographies along with books about the military, history and genealogy, including some French and English titles. Chat with Mafalda Salema, who has worked here for many years and is a font of knowledge, both about the shop’s history and the books that it stocks.

72 Rua Nova do Almada, 1249-098
+351 21 342 4422
ferin.pt
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The Feeting Room, Chiado

Already a hit in Porto, this sleek shop continues on its quest of promoting edgy Portuguese footwear with a keen eye for versatility. JAK’s minimal Royal trainers for women and Freakloset’s multi-toned derbys can be paired with smart or casual clothes and are two of the best examples of “Made in Portugal” here. The Feeting Room hosts two mini shops under its arches: one stocking Daniel Wellington watches, the other offering eyewear chosen by “optical concept store” Clérigos In. It also sells accessories and homeware.

26 Calçada do Sacramento, 1200-394
+351 21 246 4700
thefeetingroom.com
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+351, São Bento

Named after the country’s dialling code, +351 was created by Ana Penha e Costa as a tribute to the easy-going nature of her homeland, which she was missing during her time at Rio de Janeiro fashion house Osklen. Costa’s love of sea and surf inspired the casual colour palettes and relaxed shapes of her ready-to-wear collections, which include swimwear. Designed in-house, all her clothing is produced in the textile factories of Guimarães and Barcelos in the north.

81C Rua da Boavista, 1200-068
+351 21 137 9398
plus351.pt
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A Vida Portuguesa, Anjos

Expanding on the artfully packaged offerings of its original premises in Chiado, this A Vida Portuguesa shop, located in a former tile factory in the artsy Intendente area, opened in 2013. It’s the work of former journalist Catarina Portas, who now has five shops in total, including a second in Chiado and a food-focused outpost in the Mercado da Ribeira. 

Chock-full of beautiful Portuguese-made products – from port to preserves, soap to stationery, kitchenware to shoes – Portas’s alluring shops are unrivalled for souvenir-hunting and personal treats. They also serve as a useful platform for, and introduction to, Portugal’s rich design heritage.

23 Largo do Intendente Pina Manique, 1100-285 
+351 21 197 4512
avidaportuguesa.com

Images: Rodrigo Cardoso, Pedro Guimarães

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