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Dusty Deco, Östermalm

Edin Memic Kjellvertz started collecting furniture on his travels while working for Acne Studios. When his stockpile grew so large that it could no longer be contained in his apartment, he and his wife Lina opened Dusty Deco. In 2017 they opened another space in Östermalm, where 1970s lamps from Murano heavyweight Venini sit next to upholstered ottomans by US designer Jonathan Adler. The outside looks more like a florist than a furniture shop but duck inside to uncover the booty.

21 Brahegatan, 114 37 
+46 (0)8 5449 9195 
dustydeco.com
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Nitty Gritty

Nitty Gritty has two spaces a few doors apart, one for men and the other for women. On the men’s side sit seasonal items that include striped sweatshirts from The Gigi and retro-style trainers by Spalwart. For the ladies there are slouchy dresses by Base Range and jewellery from Swedish designers such as Sofia Eriksson. “Our focus is always to stay relevant,” says owner Marcus Söderlind. “We want every brand to serve a purpose here – we don’t just want to collect them.”

24 and 26 Krukmakargatan, 118 51 
+46 (0)8 658 2441 (women’s); +46 (0)8 658 2440 (men’s) 
nittygrittystore.com

Kaolin, Södermalm

Kaolin has displayed tableware and ornaments by Swedish ceramicists since 1978 and today presents wares by more than 20 artists (mostly Stockholmers) who take it in turns to man the counter. “I’ve been part of Kaolin for 15 years – it’s a great place to showcase new work and meet people interested in ceramics,” says sculptor Eva Larsson, whose bronze figures stand alongside Lars Bergstrom’s striped cups and teapots by Ann-Sofie Gelfius. A gallery space at the front hosts a new exhibition every month.

50 Hornsgatan, 118 21 
+46 (0)8 644 4600 
kaolin.se 
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Papercut, Södermalm

Andreas Fryklund and Alexander Dahlberg are unabashed in their pushing of print. Both had run shops for nearly a decade (Fryklund an independent bookshop that also sold films, Dahlberg one of the country’s biggest magazine retailers) before they joined forces and opened Papercut in 2008. There’s nothing about this retailer that says Scandi minimalism. Every last inch of the sprawling, fuss-free space has been filled with magazines, books and DVDs. The magazine spread is particularly striking, featuring more than 100 international titles on everything from architecture to cycling and erotica.

“Since we’ve both been in the business for so many years we usually go on our gut feeling,” says Fryklund. “‘Eclectic’ might be the best word to describe our selection: there’s something for everyone, from kids to grandpa and grandma.”

24-26 Krukmakargatan, 118 51 
+46 (0)8 133 574 
papercutshop.se
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Lund & Lund, Östermalm

Lund & Lund has been kitting out Stockholm’s chaps since 1963, when brothers Hans and Jesper Lund returned to the city after learning pattern-cutting in New York and London. Today their shop has retained its old-school charm: blazers from Tokyo’s Ring Jacket and a host of Italian labels such as Caruso hang in dark-wood closets, while suede trainers from Sweden’s CQP are lined up in front of tan-leather armchairs. The shop also offers made-to-measure suit tailoring so you can select your own cloth and lining.

12 Sturegatan, 114 36 
+46 (0)8 661 0735 
lundochlund.se

Images: Simon Bajada

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  • The Curator